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Books that I have read during 10 months of lockdown

I normally read quite a lot, mainly fiction, whether on kindle or hard copy. I am a member of a monthly book group which keeps me supplied with titles that I would not necessarily have chosen myself which is interesting. Otherwise I read favourite authors and books that come my way via recommendation. Friends quite often lend me books too. So I am never short of something to read. Also we have enough books in our house, collected over the years, to last me for the rest of my life!

Since the first 2020 lockdown I have continued reading and from mid-March 2020 to mid-January 2021 I read 57 books. Of these 9 were chosen by my U3AC book group, all fiction based in a real world context so no sci-fi or fantasy. 10 of the 57 books were non-fiction or mixed (for example Christmas anthologies) and 7 were children’s fiction.

When and where do I read?

It is a total luxury to read during the daytime. Sometimes I manage it especially in the autumn and winter as the days get shorter. It is also something I do on holiday but this year holidays have taken the form of three weekends away during the summer non-lockdown periods so not much reading time in total then.

Usually I read in bed before (or while!) going to sleep. Recently I have read first thing in the morning while drinking a cup of tea before getting up – a good way to start the day. The photo below includes a lovely picture of an albatross, taken by Will when he was in the Falklands. The bedside table is laden with books several of which I have yet to finish such as Clive James’s version of Dante, and Neil MacGregor’s History of the World in 100 objects.

During the daytime the conservatory is a good place to read. There are comfortable chairs there, the place is full of plants so the air is often fragranced with hoya and scented-leaf geraniums, and most importantly, the light is good.

In winter the conservatory is too cold to sit still for any length of time so I retreat to the sitting room. The selfie below (a mirror image – one day I’ll learn how to stop that happening) shows a favourite spot on the sofa, adjoining the piano. Note the lockdown hair – hairdressing salons have been out of bounds off and on for months.

Now for the books……

I keep a record of the books I have read with a comment/note to remind me what each was about. It’s very easy to forget the authors and titles of books I have read and also the subject matter, hence the list!

Book group

Kate Atkinson, A God in Ruins

Patrick Leigh Fermor, The Violins of Saint Jacques

Simon Mawer, The Glass Room (my choice and presentation to the group)

Simon Mawer, Prague Spring

Sue Monk Kidd, The Invention of Wings

Hannah Rothschild, The Improbability of Love

Kamila Shamsie, Home Fire

Olga Tokareczuk, Drive your plow over the bones of the dead

Salley Vickers, Grandmothers

Children’s Fiction

Monica Edwards, Wish for a Pony and There’s No Mistaking Corker

Anne Stafford, Five Proud Riders

These three pony books were ones that I had as a child and the paperback copies are on the tatty side as you’d expect after 65 years!

And at Christmas, regular favourites:

Raymond Briggs, The Snowman, Father Christmas and Father Christmas on Holiday

Shirley Hughes, Lucy and Tom’s Christmas

Non-fiction

John Julius Norwich, An English Christmas

Rosemary Sutcliffe, The Iliad

Ed: Simon Rae, Faber Book of Christmas

Aida Edemariam, The Wife’s Tale

Bill Bryson, The Body – A Guide for Occupants (serious content but really good fun to read!)

F. Mistral, translated by George Wicken, Memoirs

Howard Goodall, Big Bangs (a fascinating read about five major developments in the history of music)

Jan Struther, Try Anything Twice

Mary Anne Ochota, Hidden Histories

Ann Baer, Medieval Woman

Fiction

Here are a few snippets of information about some of the fiction books I have read.

Location is very important to me so I really enjoyed:

Anne Cleeves, Dead Water and Thin Air – two detective stories set in Shetland

Donna Leon, Death at La Fenice

Salley Vickers, Miss Garnett’s Angel (also set in Venice)

Rory Clements, Corpus (a thriller set in Cambridge)

Fiona Valpy, The Skylark’s Secret (1940s and 70s Loch Ewe – the naval base for the Russian convoys)

Classics

Elizabeth Gaskell, North & South, Wives & Daughters. We have dvds of films/TV series of both of these books so I read them before watching the films.

George Eliot, Mill on the Floss. I first read this in an abridged version aged about 9. It is definitely an adults’ book – I have no idea why anyone thought it was suitable for children.

John Galsworthy, Forsyte Sage vols 1, 2 and 3. I bought my paperback copies after the TV series in 1967, with photos of Susan Hampshire and Eric Porter on two of the covers. We didn’t have a television and this was the start of my habit of buying the book of the series I had not seen on TV!

Tolkien, The Father Christmas Letters

Historical and/or political

Hilary Mantel, The Mirror and the Light. I read the first two in the ‘Wolf Hall’ trilogy a few years ago and lockdown was a chance to read the third.

Victoria Hislop, Those who are loved (Civil war in Greece). I enjoy Victoria Hislop’s books partly because they are set in southern Europe in specific political periods.

Sue Monk Kidd, The Invention of Wings (USA, anti-slavery and feminism). I read this for my book group and was fascinated by the fictional representation of the abolitionist sisters Sarah and Angelina Grimké.  

Robert Harris, Pompeii; Archangel. These two historical thrillers are set in 79 AD and modern, 20th century Russia – quite a contrast.

Simon Mawer, Prague Spring and The Glass Room (Czechoslovakia in 1968, and the 1920s-50s) both pf which I read for the first time before my book group chose them. 

Kamila Shamsie, Home Fire (Islamic radicalisation based in London)

Books ‘floating’ in the sitting room to dip into

What to do Today? – an account of zoom based studio activities from April to August 2020. I was involved in one of the ‘studios’, My Outdoors.

Future – a Scottish Book Trust compendium of writings; it is a free book with an introduction by Val McDermid and the first entry is by Annie Sturgeon.

Birds in Norfolk – Andy Brown and James McCallum. This is a gorgeous book beautifully illustrated with James McCallum’s lovely paintings. The text is written by Andy Brown and provides a wealth of information.

Shetland Wool Week 2020 annual. This is a fascinating book all about wool in Shetland and includes a brilliant selection of knitting patterns. The model this year is our daughter-in-law, Jenny Sturgeon.

So this blog is a whistle-stop tour round some of my reading matter in lockdown. Being stuck at home for most of the time has not been that arduous for me because I enjoy doing things myself, like writing this blog, as well as reading.

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